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  • Share Your Thoughts: Housing & Community Development

    Share Your Thoughts: Housing & Community Development

    Date: 4/21/2021 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    Surveys & Public Input Meetings

    Marion County is currently developing a five-year plan for housing, community development, and infrastructure. The plan will guide investment policy and actions such as housing, economic development, public services, public facility, and infrastructure investments over the next several years. 

    The planning process is intended to more comprehensively fulfill three basic goals: to provide decent housing, to expand economic opportunities, and to provide a suitable living environment. The plan depends on the opinions and experiences of people who are knowledgeable about housing and community development in Marion County. 

    Your input is essential to ensuring thorough representation of people living and working in Marion County and we invite you to participate in our online survey. 

    Fair Housing Survey

    Fair Housing in Marion County - English
    Vivienda justa en el condado de Marion - Spanish

    Housing and Community Development Survey 

    Housing and Community Development - English
    Encuesta sobre Vivienda y Desarrollo Comunitario - Spanish

    Virtual Public Input Meetings

    Registration required for participation in the following meetings.
    Click on meeting link to register. 

    REGISTER:  Public Input Meeting, May 5, 2021 - 6 p.m. 
    REGISTER:  Public Input Meeting, May 6, 2021 - 6 p.m. 

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


    Read More
  • Silverton Bridge Closure & Load Rating

    Silverton Bridge Closure & Load Rating

    Date: 4/19/2021 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Public Works

    Silverton Road Bridge Replacement Project
    Silverton Road Closure & Load Rating

    Marion County has received federal funds to replace the Silverton Road Bridge over the Little Pudding River. The project is located on Silverton Road between 60th Avenue and 64th Place. The County has awarded the contract for construction to Farline Bridge, Inc., of Stayton Oregon and work has begun.

    Silverton Road will close to through traffic between 60th Avenue and 64th Place on May 12, 2021, and will reopen by Thanksgiving of 2021

    Throughout the closure, two well-marked detour routes will be in place as shown on the linked project website.

    Closing Silverton Road during construction ensures that all of the in-water work can occur within the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's designated in-water work window for the Little Pudding River in one construction season. Silverton Road will be reopened prior to the start of the holiday shopping season, a commitment made by Marion County to the Silverton business community.

     A new load rating analysis was recently completed for this bridge. As a result of ODOT's analysis, the load limit signs have been updated as shown in the sign exhibit attached. This new load limit will remain in effect until the road is closed on May 3rd. The new bridge will not be load limited for any legal or legally permitted loads.

    If you have questions or concerns regarding this notice or the project in general, please visit the project website at https://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Engineering/Projects/Pages/SilvRdBridge.aspx or contact Jill Ogden, Senior Engineering Technician, at (503)588-5036 or by email at jogden@co.marion.or.us.   

    Read More
  • Efforts to stabilize Oregon's landscape continue following wildfires

    Efforts to stabilize Oregon's landscape continue following wildfires

    Date: 4/15/2021 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    Press release issued by Oregon Emergency Management April 14, 2021.

    Efforts to stabilize Oregon’s landscape continue as land management agencies work together toward fire recovery.

    Hazard tree felling helps remove threats as work to recover fire impacted lands continue.

    Salem, OR – The devastation from Oregon’s 2020 wildfires left more than a million burned acres across 9 counties. As communities and land managers look toward recovery and restoration, the first critical step is to remove remaining hazards, especially, weakened trees along roadways and popular recreation sites, threatening the safety of people, structures and infrastructure.

    Oregon’s wildfire recovery goals continue to prioritize human life and safety while striving to restore and recover the state’s natural and cultural resources across a broad landscape. Hazard tree removal is a top priority – these dead, dying or fire-weakened trees are likely to fall onto roadways, properties and recreation areas where people travel, live, or gather. Regardless of the jurisdiction, removing this danger is paramount to Oregon’s safe and successful long-term recovery.

    “The 2020 wildfires left behind a scope of damage unlike anything the state has experienced before,” said Andrew Phelps, Director of Oregon Office of Emergency Management. “Ensuring we stabilize the landscape and mitigate risk – both immediate and long-term – is imperative to getting Oregonians home safely, keeping our roadways secure for travel and removing barriers for infrastructure and emergency response functions. I continue to be impressed by the collaboration and partnership among federal, state, public and private partners striving to balance life safety with preserving our state’s natural landscape.”

    The State’s Debris Management Task Force, led by the Oregon Department of Transportation, is primarily focused on removing hazard trees along state highways and public roads near private residences, parks, schools, utilities, and around destroyed home sites.

    Federal and state land management agencies, including the US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, are evaluating and removing hazard trees along roads, trails, parks and other popular recreation sites.

    Certified arborists assess each tree, then mark weakened or dead trees posing a threat to human life and safety following strict criteria and referencing field guides developed by federal and state agencies. The stability and health of a tree is difficult to judge from external damage so every marked tree goes under several rounds of inspections and evaluations from different arborists to avoid conflicting determinations. The goal is to mitigate risk by removing only hazard trees while leaving up as many strong, living trees as possible within the million-acre fire perimeter.

    Close collaboration with fish, wildlife and water quality experts help identify where felled trees can be left for protection of essential drinking water sources and native habitat restoration. Local agencies, communities and environmental partners also help define what recovery could entail, especially as it pertains to community safety and habitat restoration.

    Once hazards are removed and the landscape is stabilized, other recovery and restoration work such as hand planting or aerial reseeding can get safely underway. Post-fire planting usually begins one to two years after a fire, but a national seedling shortage has private landowners struggling to find enough supply for replanting. ODF is working with nurseries and others to increase supplies and fulfill long-range demand as reforestation progresses.

    The 2020 wildfires left behind damage unlike anything the state has experienced before. The road to recovery is long. It will be decades before forests grow back fully. Until then, land managers, communities, recreation enthusiasts and Oregonians will continue working together to restore natural areas and working forests while preserving Oregon’s landscape.

    For general information on the state’s recovery efforts, contact fire.info@state.or.us or visit https://wildfire.oregon.gov/.

    Read More
  • Marion County recognizes National Public Health Week

    Marion County recognizes National Public Health Week

    Date: 4/8/2021 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    As part of National Public Health Week, we’d like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the tremendous work of our Public Health Division. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, many in our community did not fully understand the role that Public Health plays in keeping us healthy.

    The division includes programs related to immunizations, STDs and HIV, communicable disease investigation, early childhood nutrition, disease prevention, modernization, vital statistics, and emergency preparedness. These programs include 81 regular employees and 34 temporary staff members supporting our COVID-19 pandemic response.

    Our Public Health Division was the first in Oregon to be accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) in 2015. Accreditation represents a commitment to excellence and continued improvement, and requires the division to demonstrate preparedness, quality improvement plans, and avenues to achieve modernization. In 2020, as we responded to the COVID-19 pandemic, the division was reaccredited by PHAB after a lengthy application and review process.

    Members of the Public Health Team continued to serve our community through the pandemic, including our Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Team. They adapted quickly to telework and found new ways to engage and connect with families in their program. As a result of the changes, the team saw an overall increase in attendance and a decline in appointment no-shows, allowing them to ensure local children have access to proper nutrition and resources to give them a healthy start in life.

    Every member of the Public Health Team has seen their job change significantly over the last year, with the majority of staff being reassigned to support our COVID-19 response. This includes roles in managing operations, contact tracing and disease investigation, communications, serving as liaisons with community partners, among others. Our county has been a leader in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is due to the exceptionally hard work and dedication of the people on our Public Health team.

    As we look forward to declining COVID-19 case rates and returning to a reality that is a bit more “normal”, we want to thank the team for all of their efforts. They have remained committed to keeping our community healthy even through one of the most trying years in our county’s history. Thank you, Marion County Public Health Division. 

    Read More
  • North Fork Corridor closes to public access

    North Fork Corridor closes to public access

    Date: 3/10/2021 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Public Works

    Marion County is temporarily restricting access and closing parks along the Little North Fork Santiam River corridor. Today, the Board of Commissioners approved two orders that will restrict public access to North Fork, Gates Hill, and Pioneer Roads to property owners and their guests, contractors, and agents. The county is additionally closing North Fork Park, Salmon Falls Park, and Bear Creek Park and Campground and the corridor will be closed to bicyclists and non-resident pedestrians.

    Public and private lands around the Little North Fork Santiam River basin were heavily damaged during the September 2020 Beachie Creek and Lionshead wildfires. The closures are meant to support rebuilding and reconstruction of wildfire damaged properties.

    Commissioner Danielle Bethell said, "These restrictions are meant to protect people from hazards in the North Fork corridor. We understand there will be frustration from the public; however, we have to do what is right and safe for everyone. We hope people will have understanding and grace through the rebuilding process." She continued, "For the time being we're encouraging people to explore Oregon's other amazing parks and recreational opportunities."

    Public Works anticipates it will take approximately 18 months to restore wildfire damaged roads and two to three years to fully rebuild county parks. Marion County parks sustained considerable damage with the near total destruction of vegetation and park amenities and it remains unsafe to enter the parks due to the large number of dead and standing trees that can fall with little or no warning.

    A large volume of woody debris, both floating and submerged, is moving down the watershed on a daily basis making it unsafe for the public to enter the Little North Fork Santiam River at this time.

    Marion County Public Works will post road signs on North Fork, Gates Hill, and Pioneer Roads notifying the public of the restricted access. Signs are expected to be in place within the next month. Additional restrictions include:

    • No parking and no bicyclists within the North Fork, Gates Hill and Pioneer Road rights-of-way.
    • No recreational access to the Little North Fork Santiam River from North Fork Road, Gates Hill Road, Pioneer Road, North Fork Park, Salmon Falls Park or Bear Creek Park and Campground.

    We appreciate the public's partnership as we begin the process of making our beautiful North Fork corridor safe for residents and visitors. 

    Read More
 

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  • Apr
    21

    Share Your Thoughts: Housing & Community Development

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    Surveys & Public Input Meetings

    Marion County is currently developing a five-year plan for housing, community development, and infrastructure. The plan will guide investment policy and actions such as housing, economic development, public services, public facility, and infrastructure investments over the next several years. 

    The planning process is intended to more comprehensively fulfill three basic goals: to provide decent housing, to expand economic opportunities, and to provide a suitable living environment. The plan depends on the opinions and experiences of people who are knowledgeable about housing and community development in Marion County. 

    Your input is essential to ensuring thorough representation of people living and working in Marion County and we invite you to participate in our online survey. 

    Fair Housing Survey

    Fair Housing in Marion County - English
    Vivienda justa en el condado de Marion - Spanish

    Housing and Community Development Survey 

    Housing and Community Development - English
    Encuesta sobre Vivienda y Desarrollo Comunitario - Spanish

    Virtual Public Input Meetings

    Registration required for participation in the following meetings.
    Click on meeting link to register. 

    REGISTER:  Public Input Meeting, May 5, 2021 - 6 p.m. 
    REGISTER:  Public Input Meeting, May 6, 2021 - 6 p.m. 

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


    Read More
    Share Your Thoughts: Housing & Community Development
  • Apr
    19

    Silverton Bridge Closure & Load Rating

    Posted by: Public Works

    Silverton Road Bridge Replacement Project
    Silverton Road Closure & Load Rating

    Marion County has received federal funds to replace the Silverton Road Bridge over the Little Pudding River. The project is located on Silverton Road between 60th Avenue and 64th Place. The County has awarded the contract for construction to Farline Bridge, Inc., of Stayton Oregon and work has begun.

    Silverton Road will close to through traffic between 60th Avenue and 64th Place on May 12, 2021, and will reopen by Thanksgiving of 2021

    Throughout the closure, two well-marked detour routes will be in place as shown on the linked project website.

    Closing Silverton Road during construction ensures that all of the in-water work can occur within the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's designated in-water work window for the Little Pudding River in one construction season. Silverton Road will be reopened prior to the start of the holiday shopping season, a commitment made by Marion County to the Silverton business community.

     A new load rating analysis was recently completed for this bridge. As a result of ODOT's analysis, the load limit signs have been updated as shown in the sign exhibit attached. This new load limit will remain in effect until the road is closed on May 3rd. The new bridge will not be load limited for any legal or legally permitted loads.

    If you have questions or concerns regarding this notice or the project in general, please visit the project website at https://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Engineering/Projects/Pages/SilvRdBridge.aspx or contact Jill Ogden, Senior Engineering Technician, at (503)588-5036 or by email at jogden@co.marion.or.us.   

    Read More
    Silverton Bridge Closure & Load Rating
  • Apr
    15

    Efforts to stabilize Oregon's landscape continue following wildfires

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    Press release issued by Oregon Emergency Management April 14, 2021.

    Efforts to stabilize Oregon’s landscape continue as land management agencies work together toward fire recovery.

    Hazard tree felling helps remove threats as work to recover fire impacted lands continue.

    Salem, OR – The devastation from Oregon’s 2020 wildfires left more than a million burned acres across 9 counties. As communities and land managers look toward recovery and restoration, the first critical step is to remove remaining hazards, especially, weakened trees along roadways and popular recreation sites, threatening the safety of people, structures and infrastructure.

    Oregon’s wildfire recovery goals continue to prioritize human life and safety while striving to restore and recover the state’s natural and cultural resources across a broad landscape. Hazard tree removal is a top priority – these dead, dying or fire-weakened trees are likely to fall onto roadways, properties and recreation areas where people travel, live, or gather. Regardless of the jurisdiction, removing this danger is paramount to Oregon’s safe and successful long-term recovery.

    “The 2020 wildfires left behind a scope of damage unlike anything the state has experienced before,” said Andrew Phelps, Director of Oregon Office of Emergency Management. “Ensuring we stabilize the landscape and mitigate risk – both immediate and long-term – is imperative to getting Oregonians home safely, keeping our roadways secure for travel and removing barriers for infrastructure and emergency response functions. I continue to be impressed by the collaboration and partnership among federal, state, public and private partners striving to balance life safety with preserving our state’s natural landscape.”

    The State’s Debris Management Task Force, led by the Oregon Department of Transportation, is primarily focused on removing hazard trees along state highways and public roads near private residences, parks, schools, utilities, and around destroyed home sites.

    Federal and state land management agencies, including the US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, are evaluating and removing hazard trees along roads, trails, parks and other popular recreation sites.

    Certified arborists assess each tree, then mark weakened or dead trees posing a threat to human life and safety following strict criteria and referencing field guides developed by federal and state agencies. The stability and health of a tree is difficult to judge from external damage so every marked tree goes under several rounds of inspections and evaluations from different arborists to avoid conflicting determinations. The goal is to mitigate risk by removing only hazard trees while leaving up as many strong, living trees as possible within the million-acre fire perimeter.

    Close collaboration with fish, wildlife and water quality experts help identify where felled trees can be left for protection of essential drinking water sources and native habitat restoration. Local agencies, communities and environmental partners also help define what recovery could entail, especially as it pertains to community safety and habitat restoration.

    Once hazards are removed and the landscape is stabilized, other recovery and restoration work such as hand planting or aerial reseeding can get safely underway. Post-fire planting usually begins one to two years after a fire, but a national seedling shortage has private landowners struggling to find enough supply for replanting. ODF is working with nurseries and others to increase supplies and fulfill long-range demand as reforestation progresses.

    The 2020 wildfires left behind damage unlike anything the state has experienced before. The road to recovery is long. It will be decades before forests grow back fully. Until then, land managers, communities, recreation enthusiasts and Oregonians will continue working together to restore natural areas and working forests while preserving Oregon’s landscape.

    For general information on the state’s recovery efforts, contact fire.info@state.or.us or visit https://wildfire.oregon.gov/.

    Read More
    Efforts to stabilize Oregon's landscape continue following wildfires
  • Apr
    13

    FDA and CDC announce pause in use of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine

    Posted by: Health and Human Services - COVID-19

    Update: Monday, April 26, 2021

    On Friday, the FDA announced that it recommends use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine be resumed. The Oregon Health Authority has cleared providers to begin using the vaccine again as long as patients are provided information warning of the rare but serious risk of blood clots. More information is available from the Oregon Health Authority.

    -------------------------------------

    On Tuesday, April 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food & Drug Administration announced that use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine has been paused while they investigate six cases of a severe and rare type of blood clot in women between the ages of 18 and 48.

    Following directives from the Oregon Health Authority, all vaccine providers in Marion County have been notified to pause use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. 

    People who have received the J&J vaccine who develop severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath within three weeks after vaccination should contact their health care provider. Health care providers are asked to report adverse events to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System at https://vaers.hhs.gov/reportevent.html.

    Resources:

    As more information becomes available, we will update this post. 


    Read More
    FDA and CDC announce pause in use of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine
  • Apr
    8

    Marion County recognizes National Public Health Week

    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    As part of National Public Health Week, we’d like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the tremendous work of our Public Health Division. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, many in our community did not fully understand the role that Public Health plays in keeping us healthy.

    The division includes programs related to immunizations, STDs and HIV, communicable disease investigation, early childhood nutrition, disease prevention, modernization, vital statistics, and emergency preparedness. These programs include 81 regular employees and 34 temporary staff members supporting our COVID-19 pandemic response.

    Our Public Health Division was the first in Oregon to be accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) in 2015. Accreditation represents a commitment to excellence and continued improvement, and requires the division to demonstrate preparedness, quality improvement plans, and avenues to achieve modernization. In 2020, as we responded to the COVID-19 pandemic, the division was reaccredited by PHAB after a lengthy application and review process.

    Members of the Public Health Team continued to serve our community through the pandemic, including our Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Team. They adapted quickly to telework and found new ways to engage and connect with families in their program. As a result of the changes, the team saw an overall increase in attendance and a decline in appointment no-shows, allowing them to ensure local children have access to proper nutrition and resources to give them a healthy start in life.

    Every member of the Public Health Team has seen their job change significantly over the last year, with the majority of staff being reassigned to support our COVID-19 response. This includes roles in managing operations, contact tracing and disease investigation, communications, serving as liaisons with community partners, among others. Our county has been a leader in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is due to the exceptionally hard work and dedication of the people on our Public Health team.

    As we look forward to declining COVID-19 case rates and returning to a reality that is a bit more “normal”, we want to thank the team for all of their efforts. They have remained committed to keeping our community healthy even through one of the most trying years in our county’s history. Thank you, Marion County Public Health Division. 

    Read More
    Marion County recognizes National Public Health Week
  • Mar
    10

    North Fork Corridor closes to public access

    Posted by: Public Works

    Marion County is temporarily restricting access and closing parks along the Little North Fork Santiam River corridor. Today, the Board of Commissioners approved two orders that will restrict public access to North Fork, Gates Hill, and Pioneer Roads to property owners and their guests, contractors, and agents. The county is additionally closing North Fork Park, Salmon Falls Park, and Bear Creek Park and Campground and the corridor will be closed to bicyclists and non-resident pedestrians.

    Public and private lands around the Little North Fork Santiam River basin were heavily damaged during the September 2020 Beachie Creek and Lionshead wildfires. The closures are meant to support rebuilding and reconstruction of wildfire damaged properties.

    Commissioner Danielle Bethell said, "These restrictions are meant to protect people from hazards in the North Fork corridor. We understand there will be frustration from the public; however, we have to do what is right and safe for everyone. We hope people will have understanding and grace through the rebuilding process." She continued, "For the time being we're encouraging people to explore Oregon's other amazing parks and recreational opportunities."

    Public Works anticipates it will take approximately 18 months to restore wildfire damaged roads and two to three years to fully rebuild county parks. Marion County parks sustained considerable damage with the near total destruction of vegetation and park amenities and it remains unsafe to enter the parks due to the large number of dead and standing trees that can fall with little or no warning.

    A large volume of woody debris, both floating and submerged, is moving down the watershed on a daily basis making it unsafe for the public to enter the Little North Fork Santiam River at this time.

    Marion County Public Works will post road signs on North Fork, Gates Hill, and Pioneer Roads notifying the public of the restricted access. Signs are expected to be in place within the next month. Additional restrictions include:

    • No parking and no bicyclists within the North Fork, Gates Hill and Pioneer Road rights-of-way.
    • No recreational access to the Little North Fork Santiam River from North Fork Road, Gates Hill Road, Pioneer Road, North Fork Park, Salmon Falls Park or Bear Creek Park and Campground.

    We appreciate the public's partnership as we begin the process of making our beautiful North Fork corridor safe for residents and visitors. 

    Read More
    North Fork Corridor closes to public access
  • Mar
    2

    Reduced Bridge Load Rating

    Posted by: Public Works

    South River Road: Willamette River Bridge
    Independence, OR 
    Bridge #05789A

    SALEM, OR – ODOT recently completed an updated load rating analysis for the South River Road Independence Bridge (bridge #05789A) over the Willamette River. As a result of ODOT's analysis, all single unit trucks will be limited to 25 tons gross vehicle weight and all tractor-trailers will be limited to 27 tons gross vehicle weight. The following sign will be posted at each end of the bridge, as well as major roads leading to the bridge. The sign depicts single unit and multi-unit truck configurations along with the respective weight limit for that configuration. These load restrictions will not affect passenger vehicles, pickups, RVs and other non-commercial vehicles.

    The County is required to post the bridge within 30 days of receiving notice of a load rating resulting in a reduction in load capacity.  An alternative route exists for many trucks via Highway 22 through West Salem. Reducing the allowable truck loads on this bridge will prevent over-stress of the structure and will help preserve this vital community link.

    If you have questions or concerns regarding this notice, please contact Jeff Johnson, Office Specialist, at (503) 588-5036 or by email at JJohnson@co.marion.or.us.   

    #  #  #

    Read More
    Reduced Bridge Load Rating
  • Feb
    22

    Toll Rates Scheduled to Change at Wheatland and Buena Vista Ferries on March 15th

    Posted by: Public Works

    ​SALEM, OR – The cost of riding the Wheatland and Buena Vista ferries is scheduled to change on March 15, 2021. At Wheatland Ferry, which crosses the Willamette River north of Keizer, the toll for vehicles less than 22 feet in length, which includes motorcycles, passenger cars and pickups, will increase $1. The new Wheatland Ferry rate will match the rate already in effect at the Buena Vista Ferry, which crosses the Willamette River at the town of Buena Vista. The toll for motorcycles, cars and pickups will remain unchanged at the Buena Vista Ferry. Bicycle tolls will remain unchanged and pedestrians will continue to be allowed to ride both ferries for free.

    The new rate structure includes toll changes for trucks and tractor-trailers greater than 22 feet in length, too. Once these rates go into effect, the toll schedule for the Wheatland and Buena Vista Ferries will be the same. Upcoming toll changes have been posted at both ferries to inform people that ride the ferries on a regular basis. You can view all Marion County ferry toll rates on the county's website at: https://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/ferries.

    The two ferries operated by Marion County provide an important transportation resource for various segments of the county. The upcoming toll increases will not make the ferry program profitable, but are designed to keep operating losses to a manageable level while keeping toll rates as low as possible. This will be the first rate increase for the Wheatland ferry in 12 years.

    Thank you for using Marion County's ferries. If you have any questions or concerns about the upcoming toll changes, please email your comments to MCDPW@co.marion.or.us.

    Read More
    Toll Rates Scheduled to Change at Wheatland and Buena Vista Ferries on March 15th
  • Feb
    19

    National Guard to provide resources to community members

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​Salem, OR – Beginning next week, members of the Oregon Army National Guard will begin to assist local authorities in ensuring the safety of county residents severely impacted by the winter storms and subsequent power outages. Since the winter storm, Marion County's Emergency Operations Center has been working with local communities to provide support for the thousands of residents who have been impacted.  The guard's support will complement the efforts of the Marion County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Teams in conducting welfare checks on vulnerable residents around the county. 

    Kevin Cameron, Board Chair, stated: "This storm has brought a tremendous new set of challenges to our community which has already faced significant difficulties due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the wildfires in September. By accepting the aid of the Oregon National Guard, we ensure we're doing all we can to provide for residents in their time of need."

    While the specific details of the deployment by the National Guard are still in the planning stages, we anticipate service members being available to assist as early as Monday morning, February 22nd.  Sheriff Joe Kast stated, "We look forward to having the women and men from the National Guard coming to assist our Search and Rescue teams with getting resources out into the community.  We'll be working with Emergency Management to get them supplied with water, blankets, and other supplies our community members may need."  Community members seeing National Guard service members can expect to see them wearing bright reflective vests to assist with being more visible to those in need of assistance.

    Marion County has established a call center for community members to request support, welfare checks, and information related to debris cleanup at 503-588-5108. The information is also available online at: www.co.marion.or.us/alerts


    Read More
    National Guard to provide resources to community members
  • Jan
    21

    Silverton Road Bridge Replacement Project Upcoming Construction

    Posted by: Public Works

    ​SALEM, OR – Marion County has received federal funds to replace the Silverton Road Bridge over the Little Pudding River. The project is located on Silverton Road between 60th Avenue and 64th Place. The County has awarded the contract for construction to Farline Bridge, Inc., of Stayton Oregon and construction is scheduled to begin this spring. The contractor's closure schedule will be released when it becomes available.

    During construction, Silverton Road will be closed to through traffic between 60th Avenue and 64th Place. The closure will start this spring and will end by Thanksgiving 2021. While Silverton Road is closed, two well-marked detour routes will be in place.

    Closing Silverton Road during construction ensures that all of the in-water work can occur within the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's designated in-water work window for the Little Pudding River in one construction season. Silverton Road will be reopened prior to the start of the holiday shopping season, a commitment made by Marion County to the Silverton business community.                                     

    If you have questions or concerns regarding this notice or the project in general, please visit the project website at https://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Engineering/Projects/Pages/SilvRdBridge.aspx or contact Jill Ogden, Senior Engineering Technician, at (503)588-5036 or by email at jogden@co.marion.or.us.  


    Read More
    Silverton Road Bridge Replacement Project Upcoming Construction
  • Dec
    1

    County expands mental health crisis services to serve Woodburn community

    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    ​Woodburn, OR - In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, many community members find themselves struggling with mental health. In response, Marion County Health & Human Services, which has operated a crisis center in Salem for over 25 years, has expanded its mental health crisis services to the Woodburn community.

    Beginning today, December 1, 2020, crisis counselors will be on-site at the department’s Woodburn office seven days a week from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Counselors can assist those who are struggling with depression, anxiety, and thoughts of suicide. No appointments are necessary to utilize the program; individuals may walk-in for service or call the Woodburn office at 503-981-5851.

    Cydney Nestor, Behavioral Health Division Director, said, “We are pleased to offer local, convenient mental health care to the Woodburn community. This area has been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, and these supportive services are needed now more than ever. Our hope is to provide a safe space for youth, families and adults of all ages to get the help and support they need.”

    Services will be offered in English and Spanish, with interpreter services available in other languages as needed. Individuals may receive services regardless of insurance, immigration status, or ability to pay. Marion County Health & Human Services’ Woodburn office is located at 976 N. Pacific Highway.

    More information about Marion County’s Behavioral Health Programs is available at: www.mchealthy.net.


    Read More
    County expands mental health crisis services to serve Woodburn community
  • Jun
    23

    County works to finalize contract with local hotel for isolation rooms

    Posted by: Health and Human Services - COVID-19

    ​Marion County Health & Human Services is working to finalize a contract with a local hotel in the Woodburn area to provide an isolated, short-term location for Marion County residents with a possible exposure or a confirmed case of COVID-19 with mild symptoms, to self-isolate when they cannot otherwise do so safely. The contract is a requirement under Oregon Governor Kate Brown’s phased reopening framework, and is intended to ensure the county is prepared to protect residents and prevent the spread of the virus as the state moves forward with reopening.

    The hotel, an 81-room facility in the Woodburn-area, was selected because it will allow guests to safely distance themselves from others while also providing access to an on-site public health nurse to provide wellness checks and monitor symptoms. The hotel has been secured to house people unable to safely isolate, including farm workers and those who are under the supervision of Marion County Parole and Probation. The typical term of stay will be 14 days to isolate and quarantine, depending on the time frame of when the individual developed symptoms or was exposed to the virus. To start, the county anticipates that 10-15 individuals will be housed in the hotel.

    The safety and security of the community are a top priority for the county. Each guest will sign a Standards of Conduct Agreement, outlining acceptable behaviors and expectations while in isolation. Security will be at the hotel 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Guests will not leave the facility during the isolation period and Marion County staff will tend to the needs of the individuals, including food and wellness checks.

    Marion County’s Public Health Director, Katrina Rothenberger, stated, “This is a required resource for many people in our community who do not have other means to protect friends, coworkers, or loved ones from COVID-19 if they have a confirmed case or have been exposed. The hotel will allow us to slow the spread of COVID-19 by giving those with no place else to go a place to safely isolate.”

    Before individuals leave the hotel, their symptoms will have been monitored for a minimum of three days by the on-site public health nurse, and transportation will be coordinated to return the individual to their community upon leaving the hotel. The county Health and Human Services Department will begin managing the facility on July 1, 2020.


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    County works to finalize contract with local hotel for isolation rooms
  • Jun
    17

    Phase 2 Reopening of Marion County to Begin on June 19

    Posted by: Health and Human Services - COVID-19

    ​On Wednesday, June 17, 2020, Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Health Authority approved Marion County to enter Phase 2 of its reopening roadmap. Starting June 19, many additional types of businesses and activities will be allowed to resume or expand operations. Commissioner Kevin Cameron said that, “This important milestone comes at a critical time of need as families struggle with unemployment, businesses work hard to recover, and farmers begin their harvests. We’re thrilled to enter Phase 2 and get public life in Marion County moving again.”

    In Phase 2, swimming pools, bowling alleys, movie theaters, and arcades can reopen. Bars and restaurants will be able to expand hours of operation to stay open until midnight. Social, civic, and faith-based gatherings can meet in larger groups. Some recreational sports can resume, including training activities within college athletic programs. Importantly, Phase 2 retains several physical distancing and sanitation measures for businesses and other activities to help limit the spread of the coronavirus as people become more active in the community.

    Marion County’s roadmap for reopening was developed in collaboration with county health experts, other local leaders, and regional public health partners. According to Commission Chair Colm Willis, “We’re proud to see that our county has successfully slowed the spread of COVID-19 to the point where we can confidently move into Phase 2. Today’s success is a testament to the hard work and resiliency of the people of Marion County.”

    Throughout reopening, anyone who feels sick should remain at home. Additionally, high-risk individuals who are over 65 years of age or suffering from chronic illnesses should continue to remain home as much as possible. We encourage all individuals to continue to follow physical distancing guidelines. All businesses, organizations, and activities that choose to reopen should follow state guidelines, many of which are available by specific sector and type of activity. Face coverings are strongly recommended for all individuals and are required for employees in many businesses.

    Guidance for businesses and other information is available on the county’s website: COVID-19.MCHealthy.net.




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    Phase 2 Reopening of Marion County to Begin on June 19
  • Jun
    17

    Bat Tests Positive for Rabies in Marion County

    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    ​Public health officials are warning area residents to take precautions after a rabid bat was found in the Stayton area of Marion County, Oregon. 

    A dog with a current rabies vaccine owned by a resident of the Stayton area was bitten by a bat on June 12, 2020.  The bat was sent to Oregon State University for testing. Results confirmed the bat was positive for rabies. Based on the positive test, Marion County Public Health recommended the dog be quarantined for 45 days and given another rabies vaccine. 

    According to the Oregon Health Authority, bats are the most common carriers of rabies in this 
    state. About 8-10% of bats tested for rabies are positive every year. So far in 2020, 3 bats have tested positive for rabies in Oregon. 

    Authorities emphasize the main protection for humans is to make sure pets are vaccinated and avoid contact with stray animals and wildlife. Public health officials advise taking extreme precautions before attempting to handle a bat. If it is necessary to pick up a bat, it is best to wear heavy gloves, use a shovel, or both. 

    The public should not approach bats, wildlife, or other mammals seen exhibiting odd behavior. Sick bats may be seen flopping around on the ground or otherwise acting unusual. If you find a sick bat or other sick wildlife on your property, take children and pets indoors. If you do have an exposure (e.g., scratch or bite) from a bat, immediately clean the wound and seek medical attention. If the bat has been captured, do not crush the bat or throw it away, as intact bats can be tested for rabies, which can help avoid post-exposure rabies shots. If your pet has encountered a bat or been bitten by a wild animal, contact your veterinarian immediately or call the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife at 866-968-2600. 

    In the event of bat contact such as a bite or scratch, an attempt should be made to safely capture the bat for testing for the rabies virus. Efforts should be made to collect the bat without destroying the head and the bat should be kept in a cool place. Immediately seek medical attention and report the incident to Marion County at 503-588-5346. 

    For more information about rabies, please visit the Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division website at: 
    https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/DISEASESAZ/RABIES/Pages/rabies.aspx

    Information is also available on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website at:  https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html  


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    Bat Tests Positive for Rabies in Marion County
  • Jun
    11

    Phase 2 Reopening Deferred Another Week

    Posted by: Health and Human Services - COVID-19

    ​On Thursday, June 11, 2020, Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Health Authority determined that Marion County was not approved to enter Phase 2 of reopening on Friday, June 12. In her letter to the county, Governor Brown noted that it failed to meet two of the six criteria laid out in her guidelines for Phase 2 reopening. The county’s application will be reassessed in one week based off of data gathered in the next seven day period. 

    In response to Governor Brown’s decision, Commission Chair Colm Willis shared, “We are disappointed in the governor’s decision. The County has worked diligently with our Public Health team to ensure we are prepared for a safe Phase 2 reopening. We will continue this work and are hopeful that our application will be approved as soon as possible.” 


    Marion County’s roadmap for reopening was developed in collaboration with county health experts, local leaders, and regional public health partners. The county will continue to evaluate the data as it is available and looks forward to entering Phase 2 as soon as possible. County Commissioner Kevin Cameron said, “Of course we want to see the number of cases falling steadily, but that is an unrealistic expectation. As more businesses reopen and people are doing more activities outside their homes, some occasional increases are anticipated. With the increase in testing throughout the county, we can also expect to see an uptick in known cases. We are also working closely with farms and food processing facilities to prevent outbreaks in facilities where physical distancing is often a challenge.” 

    As the county looks toward Phase 2 of reopening, the health and safety of all Marion County residents is top of mind. This decision comes at a critical time of need as families struggle with unemployment, businesses work hard to recover, and farmers begin their harvests. County Commissioner Sam Brentano stated “I don’t agree with the decision and I think it’s time we explore all our options. “ 

    Marion County remains committed to working with the Governor’s office, the Oregon Health Authority, and local health and community partners to enter Phase 2 of reopening once state officials give their approval. 


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    Phase 2 Reopening Deferred Another Week
  • May
    20

    Limited Reopening of Marion County to Begin on May 22

    Posted by:

    ​On Wednesday, May 20, 2020, Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Health Authority approved the Community Roadmap for a Limited Reopening of Marion County starting Friday, May 22.

    The approved plan represents a collaboration with state and county health experts, local leaders, and regional public health partners. According to Commission Chair Colm Willis, "We are proud of what our communities and public health teams have accomplished to slow the spread of COVID-19. As we have all worked together to protect public health, we have also seen businesses closed and livelihoods destroyed. Our plan encourages businesses, churches, and other organizations to move forward in a limited capacity while continuing to protect the health of our community."

    Phase 1 of the approved community roadmap allows reopening of several types of businesses and services, while keeping sanitation, physical distancing, face covering, and crowd size measures in place. Eventually, phases 2 and 3 of the plan allow for increased gathering sizes and resumption of non-essential travel, nursing home and hospital visits, and additional seating at restaurants, bars, and other venues. The county is required to remain in Phase 1 for at least 21 days, and advancement to phases 2 and 3 will be allowed only if public health monitoring indicates it is safe.

    Throughout reopening, anyone who feels sick should remain at home. Additionally, high-risk individuals who are over 65 years of age or suffering chronic illnesses should continue to remain home as much as possible. All businesses and organizations that choose to reopen should follow state guidelines, many of which are described in detail sector by sector. We encourage all individuals to continue to follow physical distancing guidelines.

    In recognition that additional restrictions and guidelines may be needed as circumstances evolve, we remain committed to working with the Governor's office, the Oregon Health Authority, and local health and community partners to monitor progress and refine the roadmap as needed.


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    Limited Reopening of Marion County to Begin on May 22
  • May
    14

    Marion County Reopening to Begin Later than Proposed

    Posted by: Health and Human Services - COVID-19

    ​On Thursday, May 14, 2020, Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Health Authority determined that Marion County's application for a limited reopening must be deferred to a later date. While many counties across Oregon will begin reopening on May 15, others, including Marion and Polk counties, will not yet reopen. Our application will be reviewed by the state again next Wednesday.

    Meanwhile, statewide and in Marion County, some stand-alone "Main Street" retail businesses, such as furniture stores, art galleries, jewelry stores, and boutiques, can reopen on May 15 if they agree to follow safety guidelines. Additionally, childcare, summer school, camps, and youth programs can reopen with specific limitations and guidelines. We also want our community to know that all county parks and boat ramps will be open for day use beginning May 15 (playgrounds will remain closed).

    In response to Governor Brown's decision, Commission Chair Colm Willis shared, "My heart goes out to all of the people who have been affected by this virus, including all of the family-owned businesses and their employees who have not had a paycheck for more than two months. We will continue to do everything we can to fight the spread of COVID-19 in our community and get the people of Marion County back to work as soon as possible."

    We remain committed to working with the Governor's office, the Oregon Health Authority, and local health and community partners. We are reviewing the information provided by the Governor's Office and are considering all of our options in moving forward toward timely reopening.


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    Marion County Reopening to Begin Later than Proposed
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